Official Sightseeing Tours of Scotland since 1907

3 GREAT WAYS TO DISCOVER LOCH NESS & THE HIGHLANDS FROM ONLY £35 pp!

The Original Loch Ness Tour

Our best value
only £35
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Loch Ness and the Highlands

Smaller group size
from £41
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Loch Ness, Glen Coe & Inverness

Multi-lingual tour
from £45
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Book your hotel in the Scottish Highlands

SYMBOLS OF SCOTLAND

The Saltire

This flag is part of Scotland's special identity. The Scottish flag or `saltire' is derived from the cross of St Andrew, Scotland's patron saint. Its adoption is said to date from a battle, some say in 756 between a combined force of Picts and Scots against invading Northumbrians under their leader Athelstane. King Angus I of Scots prayed to St Andrew and when battle was joined a vision of the cross of St Andrew was seen, white against a blue sky. This helped the Scots to victory. You will see the flag flying in plenty of locations throughout the country, as Scotland's own symbol, notably at Athelstaneford, near Haddington, East Lothian, site of the ancient battle.

The cross is also part of the Union Jack, symbol of the United Kingdom.

The Lion Rampant flag was chosen by William I of Scotland for his standard. It shows the red lion standing on its hind legs surrounded by a border of fleurs-de-lis.

Tartan

The distinctive checked cloth of the Highlands has now come to represent all of Scotland.

The Thistle

This is another reminder of Scotland. Its role as a Scottish emblem relates to an incident in an early battle against Scandinavian invaders. The Scots, it is said, were alerted to a raiding party advancing under cover of darkness when one of the barefoot raiders yelled in pain after stepping on a Thistle!

The Scottish Crown Jewels

The Scottish Crown Jewels, known as the Honours of Scotland, are the oldest regalia in the British Isles. They comprise a crown, a sword and a sceptre, all of which date from the 15th and 16th centuries. Together with the Stone of Destiny, these symbols of Scottish nationhood are on permanent public display at Edinburgh Castle.